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20130117
20130125
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
the campaign. those two factors drive this issue down, but something like hurricane sandy, that could be a wake-up call. >> and hurricane sandy cost a lot of money. now, it's tough with all the pork that went in the bills, but bear with me, we got a $50 billion appropriation that just came to affected states. that cost a lot of money. so might it not, even if we're not really sure what a cut in emissions might do right now to the trajectory of the climate change that we've experienced, might it not be worth trying to do something about things? whether through carbon monoxide emissions, co2? >> no, i don't think so. no matter what we do, we're not going to have the impact unless the rest of the world goes along and we're going to drive up costs on people. for example, coal-fired plants. 19 just shut down in georgia. do people really want to do things like that nationwide when china, russia, india, brazil aren't going to do them? probably not. long term, it's probably not going to have an impact. we've had extreme weather in the past. the 1950s had more extreme weather than now. unless people sta
now. they have taxes raised and passed the sandy relief on a bipartisan vote and they will pass immigration reform and deal with the debt ceiling. he broke the republicans's arms on that. >> still got the votes. >> sandy relief who will disagree on that? >> a lot of of people. remember how chris christie was screaming? >> screaming at -- >> house republicans. >> right. >> what happens is up until now you had something called the hastert rule in the house. republicans stood together. that has been demolished in the last month. it's going to continue to be demolished when votes on immigration comes up and solving the sequestration money comes up and also on the budget. the real test for the president is whether he is going to go up against his own caucus to do things on medicare social security and a few other issues. >> we are looking at the president on a motorcade going down pennsylvania avenue. every time i look at the inaugural route, i can't help but go back to january 20th 1977 and jimmy carter breaking precedent and stepping out of the car and shaking h
of the sandy supplemental. it did not get into the house side. so we're still looking for the house to act. currently, the house has holds on bilateral security assistance, on other kinds of support for anti-terrorism assistance. so we got to get our act together between the administration and the congress. >> the cia has a black box budget, a secret budget that is at least partly secret, right, opaque, unquestionable. and even if we did know how big the intelligence budget was for the cia and the rest of the intelligence community in this country, rest assured that the only political impact of knowing that number is that someone in congress would insist that we double that number. the united states military has a budget so gargantuan that it roughly approximates the military budgets of all of our conceivable adversaries and major allies combined. the state department is the only part of the u.s. government that fields high-level personnel doing high security, high tension work in highly sensitive places around the globe alongside the intelligence and the military, except they, the state d
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)